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MEPHIST. As great as have the human souls of men.
But, tell me, Faustus, shall I have thy soul?
And I will be thy slave, and wait on thee,
And give thee more than thou hast wit to ask.

FAUSTUS. Ay, Mephistophilis, I'll give it thee.(49)

MEPHIST. Then, Faustus, stab thine(50) arm courageously,
And bind thy soul, that at some certain day
Great Lucifer may claim it as his own;
And(51) then be thou as great as Lucifer.

FAUSTUS. [Stabbing his arm] Lo, Mephistophilis, for love of thee,
Faustus hath cut his arm, and with his proper blood
Assures his soul to be great Lucifer's,
Chief lord and regent of perpetual night!
View here this blood that trickles from mine arm,
And let it be propitious for my(52) wish.

MEPHIST. But, Faustus,
Write it in manner of a deed of gift.

FAUSTUS. [Writing] Ay, so I do. But, Mephistophilis,
My blood congeals, and I can write no more.

MEPHIST. I'll fetch thee fire to dissolve it straight.
          [Exit.]

FAUSTUS. What might the staying of my blood portend?
Is it(53) unwilling I should write this bill?
Why streams it not, that I may write afresh?
FAUSTUS GIVES TO THEE HIS SOUL: O, there it stay'd!
Why shouldst thou not? is not thy soul thine own?
Then write again, FAUSTUS GIVES TO THEE HIS SOUL.(54)

          Re-enter MEPHISTOPHILIS with the chafer of fire.

MEPHIST. See, Faustus, here is fire; set it on.

FAUSTUS. So, now the blood begins to clear again;
Now will I make an(55) end immediately.
          [Writes.]

MEPHIST. What will not I do to obtain his soul?
          [Aside.]

FAUSTUS. Consummatum est; this bill is ended,
And Faustus hath bequeath'd his soul to Lucifer.
But what is this inscription on mine arm?
Homo, fuge: whither should(56) I fly?
If unto God,(57) he'll throw me down to hell.
My senses are deceiv'd; here's nothing writ:--
O, yes, I see it plain; even here is writ,
Homo, fuge: yet shall not Faustus fly.

MEPHIST. I'll fetch him somewhat to delight his mind.
          [Aside, and then exit.]

          Enter DEVILS, giving crowns and rich apparel to FAUSTUS.
          They dance, and then depart.

          Re-enter MEPHISTOPHILIS.

FAUSTUS. What means this show? speak, Mephistophilis.

MEPHIST. Nothing, Faustus, but to delight thy mind,
And let thee see what magic can perform.

FAUSTUS. But may I raise such spirits when I please?

MEPHIST. Ay, Faustus, and do greater things than these.

FAUSTUS. Then, Mephistophilis, receive this scroll,(58)
A deed of gift of body and of soul:
But yet conditionally that thou perform
All covenants and articles between us both!

MEPHIST. Faustus, I swear by hell and Lucifer
To effect all promises between us both!

FAUSTUS. Then hear me read it, Mephistophilis.
          [Reads.]
ON THESE CONDITIONS FOLLOWING. FIRST, THAT FAUSTUS MAY BE A
SPIRIT IN FORM AND SUBSTANCE. SECONDLY, THAT MEPHISTOPHILIS
SHALL BE HIS SERVANT, AND BE BY HIM COMMANDED. THIRDLY, THAT
MEPHISTOPHILIS SHALL DO FOR HIM, AND BRING HIM WHATSOEVER HE
DESIRES.(59) FOURTHLY, THAT HE SHALL BE IN HIS CHAMBER OR HOUSE
INVISIBLE. LASTLY, THAT HE SHALL APPEAR TO THE SAID JOHN FAUSTUS,
AT ALL TIMES, IN WHAT SHAPE AND FORM SOEVER HE PLEASE. I, JOHN
FAUSTUS, OF WITTENBERG, DOCTOR, BY THESE PRESENTS, DO GIVE BOTH
BODY AND SOUL TO LUCIFER PRINCE OF THE EAST, AND HIS MINISTER
MEPHISTOPHILIS; AND FURTHERMORE GRANT UNTO THEM, THAT, FOUR-AND-
TWENTY YEARS BEING EXPIRED, AND THESE ARTICLES ABOVE-WRITTEN
BEING INVIOLATE, FULL POWER TO FETCH OR CARRY THE SAID JOHN FAUSTUS,
BODY AND SOUL, FLESH AND(60) BLOOD, INTO THEIR HABITATION WHERESOEVER.
BY ME, JOHN FAUSTUS.

MEPHIST. Speak, Faustus, do you deliver this as your deed?

FAUSTUS. Ay, take it, and the devil give thee good of it!

MEPHIST. So, now, Faustus, ask me what thou wilt.

FAUSTUS. First I will question with(61) thee about hell.
Tell me, where is the(62) place that men call hell?

MEPHIST. Under the heavens.

FAUSTUS. Ay, so are all things else; but whereabouts?

MEPHIST. Within the bowels of these elements,
Where we are tortur'd and remain for ever:
Hell hath no limits, nor is circumscrib'd
In one self-place; but where we are is hell,
And where hell is, there must we ever be:
And, to be short, when all the world dissolves,
And every creature shall be purified,
All places shall be hell that are(63) not heaven.

FAUSTUS. I think hell's a fable.(64)

MEPHIST. Ay, think so still, till experience change thy mind.

FAUSTUS. Why, dost thou think that Faustus shall be damn'd?

MEPHIST. Ay, of necessity, for here's the scroll
In which thou hast given thy soul to Lucifer.

FAUSTUS. Ay, and body too; and what of that?
Think'st thou that Faustus is so fond to imagine
That, after this life, there is any pain?
No, these are trifles and mere old wives' tales.

MEPHIST. But I am an instance to prove the contrary,
For I tell thee I am damn'd and now in hell.

FAUSTUS. Nay, an this be hell, I'll willingly be damn'd:
What! sleeping, eating, walking, and disputing!
But, leaving this, let me have a wife,
The fairest maid in Germany;
For I am wanton and lascivious,
And cannot live without a wife.

MEPHIST. Well, Faustus, thou shalt have a wife.

          [MEPHISTOPHILIS fetches in a WOMAN-DEVIL.]

FAUSTUS. What sight is this?

MEPHIST. Now, Faustus, wilt thou have a wife?

FAUSTUS. Here's a hot whore, indeed: no, I'll no wife.

MEPHIST. Marriage is but a ceremonial toy,
And, if thou lov'st me, think no more of it.
I'll cull thee out the fairest courtezans,
And bring them every morning to thy bed:
She whom thine(65) eye shall like, thy(66) heart shall have,
Were she as chaste as was(67) Penelope,
As wise as Saba, or as beautiful
As was bright Lucifer before his fall.
Here, take this book, peruse it well:
The iterating of these lines brings gold;
The framing of this circle on the ground
Brings thunder, whirlwinds, storm, and lightning;
Pronounce this thrice devoutly to thyself,
And men in harness(68) shall appear to thee,
Ready to execute what thou command'st.

FAUSTUS. Thanks, Mephistophilis, for this sweet book:
This will I keep as chary as my life.
          [Exeunt.]

          Enter FAUSTUS, in his study, and MEPHISTOPHILIS.

FAUSTUS. When I behold the heavens,(69) then I repent,
And curse thee, wicked Mephistophilis,
Because thou hast depriv'd me of those joys.

MEPHIST. 'Twas thine(70) own seeking, Faustus; thank thyself.
But, think'st thou heaven is(71) such a glorious thing?
I tell thee, Faustus, it is not half so fair
As thou, or any man that breathes(72) on earth.

FAUSTUS. How prov'st thou that?

MEPHIST. 'Twas made for man; then he's more excellent.

FAUSTUS. If heaven was made for man, 'twas made for me:
I will renounce this magic and repent.

          Enter GOOD ANGEL and EVIL ANGEL.

GOOD ANGEL. Faustus, repent; yet God will pity thee.

EVIL ANGEL. Thou art a spirit; God cannot pity thee.

FAUSTUS. Who buzzeth in mine ears(73) I am a spirit?
Be I a devil, yet God may pity me;
Yea, God will pity me, if I repent.

EVIL ANGEL. Ay, but Faustus never shall repent.
          [Exeunt ANGELS.]

FAUSTUS. My heart is harden'd, I cannot repent;
Scarce can I name salvation, faith, or heaven:
Swords, poisons, halters, and envenom'd steel
Are laid before me to despatch myself;
And long ere this I(74) should have done the deed,
Had not sweet pleasure conquer'd deep despair.
Have not I made blind Homer sing to me
Of Alexander's love and Oenon's death?
And hath not he, that built the walls of Thebes
With ravishing sound of his melodious harp,
Made music with my Mephistophilis?
Why should I die, then, or basely despair?
I am resolv'd; Faustus shall not repent.--
Come, Mephistophilis, let us dispute again,
And reason of divine astrology.
Speak, are there many spheres above the moon?
Are all celestial bodies but one globe,
As is the substance of this centric earth?

MEPHIST. As are the elements, such are the heavens,
Even from the moon unto th' empyreal orb,
Mutually folded in each other's spheres,
And jointly move upon one axletree,
Whose termine(75) is term'd the world's wide pole;
Nor are the names of Saturn, Mars, or Jupiter
Feign'd, but are erring(76) stars.

FAUSTUS. But have they all one motion, both situ et tempore?

MEPHIST. All move from east to west in four-and-twenty
hours upon the poles of the world; but differ in their motions
upon the poles of the zodiac.

FAUSTUS. These slender questions Wagner can decide:
Hath Mephistophilis no greater skill?
Who knows not the double motion(77) of the planets?
That the first is finish'd in a natural day;
The second thus; Saturn in thirty years; Jupiter in twelve;
Mars in four; the Sun, Venus, and Mercury in a year; the Moon
in twenty-eight days. These are freshmen's questions. But
tell me, hath every sphere a dominion or intelligentia?

MEPHIST. Ay.

FAUSTUS. How many heavens or spheres are there?

MEPHIST. Nine; the seven planets, the firmament, and the empyreal
heaven.

FAUSTUS. But is there not coelum igneum et crystallinum?

MEPHIST. No, Faustus, they be but fables.

FAUSTUS. Resolve me, then, in this one question; why are not
conjunctions, oppositions, aspects, eclipses, all at one time,
but in some years we have more, in some less?

MEPHIST. Per inoequalem motum respectu totius.

FAUSTUS. Well, I am answered. Now tell me who made the world?

MEPHIST. I will not.

FAUSTUS. Sweet Mephistophilis, tell me.

MEPHIST. Move me not, Faustus.

FAUSTUS. Villain, have I not bound thee to tell me any thing?

MEPHIST. Ay,(78) that is not against our kingdom; this is.
Thou art damned; think thou of hell.

FAUSTUS. Think, Faustus, upon God that made the world.

MEPHIST. Remember this.
          [Exit.]

FAUSTUS. Ay, go, accursed spirit, to ugly hell!
'Tis thou hast damn'd distressed Faustus' soul.
Is't not too late?

          Re-enter GOOD ANGEL and EVIL ANGEL.

EVIL ANGEL. Too late.

GOOD ANGEL. Never too late, if Faustus will repent.

EVIL ANGEL. If thou repent, devils will tear thee in pieces.

GOOD ANGEL. Repent, and they shall never raze thy skin.
          [Exeunt ANGELS.]

FAUSTUS. O Christ, my Saviour, my Saviour
Help to save distressed Faustus' soul!

          Enter LUCIFER, BELZEBUB, and MEPHISTOPHILIS.

LUCIFER. Christ cannot save thy soul, for he is just:
There's none but I have interest in the same.

FAUSTUS. O, what art thou that look'st so terribly?

LUCIFER. I am Lucifer,
And this is my companion-prince in hell.

FAUSTUS. O Faustus, they are come to fetch thy soul!

Footnotes:

(49) thee] So 4to 1604.--The later 4tos "him."

(50) thine] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "thy."

(51) And] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

(52) my] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "thy."

(53) Is it] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "It is."

(54) soul] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

(55) an] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--Not in 4to 1624.

(56) should] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "shall."

(57) God] So 4to 1604.--The later 4tos "heauen."

(58) this scroll] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

(59) he desires] Not in the 4tos. See note --, p. 86.

(Note --, from p. 86. (Doctor Faustus, from the quarto of 1604):

"he desires] Not in any of the four 4tos. In the tract just
          cited, (i.e. THE HISTORY OF DOCTOR FAUSTUS, ed. 1648.) the
          "3d Article" stands thus,--"That Mephostophiles should bring
          him any thing, and doe for him whatsoever." Sig. A 4, ed.
          1648. A later ed. adds "he desired." Marlowe, no doubt,
          followed some edition of the HISTORY in which these words,
          or something equivalent to them, had been omitted by mistake.
          (2to 1661, which I consider as of no authority, has "he
          requireth.")")


(60) and] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--Not in 4to 1616.

(61) with] So 4to 1604.--Not in the later 4tos.

(62) the] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "that."

(63) are] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "is."

(64) hell's a fable] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "hell's a
MEERE fable."

(65) thine] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "thy."

(66) thy] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "thine."

(67) was] So 4to 1616.--2tos 1624, 1631, "were."

(68) harness] i.e. armour.

(69) This will I keep as chary as my life.
          [Exeunt.]

          Enter FAUSTUS, in his study, and MEPHISTOPHILIS.

          FAUSTUS. When I behold the heavens, &c.]

Old eds. (that is, 4tos 1616, 1624, 1631) thus;

"This will I keepe, as chary as my life.
          [Exeunt.]

          Enter WAGNER solus.

WAGNER. Learned Faustus
To know the secrets of Astronomy
Grauen in the booke of Joues high firmament,
Did mount himselfe to scale Olympus top,
Being seated in a chariot burning bright,
Drawne by the strength of yoaky [2to 1624 "yoaked"] Dragons necks,
He now is gone to proue Cosmography,
And as I gesse will first arriue at Rome,
To see the Pope and manner of his Court;
And take some part of holy Peters feast,
That to [2tos 1624, 1631, "on"] this day is highly solemnized.
          Exit WAGNER.

          Enter FAUSTUS in his Study, and MEPHISTOPHILIS.

FAUSTUS. When I behold the heauens," &c.

The lines which I have here omitted belong to a subsequent part
of the play, where they will be found with considerable additions,
and are rightly assigned to the CHORUS. (As given in the present
place by the 4tos 1616, 1624, 1631, these lines exhibit the text
of the earlier FAUSTUS; see p. 90, sec. col.) It would seem that
something was intended to intervene here between the exit of Faustus
and Mephistophilis, and their re-appearance on the stage: compare,
however, the preceding play, p. 88, first col.


(p. 90, sec. col. (Doctor Faustus, from the quarto of 1604):

"FAUSTUS. Great thanks, mighty Lucifer!
          This will I keep as chary as my life.

          LUCIFER. Farewell, Faustus, and think on the devil.

          FAUSTUS. Farewell, great Lucifer.
          [Exeunt LUCIFER and BELZEBUB.]

          Come, Mephistophilis.
          [Exeunt.]

          Enter CHORUS.

          CHORUS. Learned Faustus,
          To know the secrets of astronomy
          Graven in the book of Jove's high firmament,
          Did mount himself to scale Olympus' top,
          Being seated in a chariot burning bright,
          Drawn by the strength of yoky dragons' necks.
          He now is gone to prove cosmography,
          And, as I guess, will first arrive at Rome,
          To see the Pope and manner of his court,
          And take some part of holy Peter's feast,
          That to this day is highly solemniz'd.
          [Exit.]

          Enter FAUSTUS and MEPHISTOPHILIS.

          FAUSTUS. Having now, my good Mephistophilis,
          Pass'd with delight the stately town of Trier," etc.)


(p. 88, first col. (Doctor Faustus, from the quarto of 1604):)

(This part of the play does not have any relevance to characters
          leaving the stage and re-entering.)


(Perhaps the editor meant p. 93, first column.)

(p. 93, first col. (Doctor Faustus, from the quarto of 1604):

"RALPH. O, brave, Robin! shall I have Nan Spit, and to mine
          own use? On that condition I'll feed thy devil with horse-
          bread as long as he lives, of free cost.

          ROBIN. No more, sweet Ralph: let's go and make clean our
          boots, which lie foul upon our hands, and then to our conjuring
          in the devil's name.
          [Exeunt.]

          Enter ROBIN and RALPH with a silver goblet.

          ROBIN. Come, Ralph: did not I tell thee, we were for ever
          made by this Doctor Faustus' book? ecce, signum! here's a
          simple purchase for horse-keepers: our horses shall eat
          no hay as long as this lasts.

          RALPH. But, Robin, here comes the Vintner.")

(70) thine] So 4tos 1616, 1624.--2to 1631 "thy."

(71) is] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.

(72) breathes] So 4tos 1624, 1631.--2to 1616 "breathe."

(73) ears] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "eare."

(74) this I] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "this TIME I."

(75) termine] I may notice that 4to 1604 (see p. 88, sec. col.)
has "terminine," which at least is better for the metre.

(p. 88, second column, (Doctor Faustus, from the quarto of 1604):

"Whose terminine is term'd the world's wide pole;")

(76) erring] So 4to 1604.--The later 4tos "euening."

(77) motion] So 4tos 1616, 1631.--2to 1624 "motions."

(78) Ay] So 4to 1616.--Not in 4tos 1624, 1631.